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ARTH 101                                                                                                       

PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS

PROF. CATHERINE SCALLEN                                                                          

MWF 10:35-11:25 

Prehistoric cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum in Rome, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral.   ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shaper the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions.  We will also emphasize the continuing relevance of art from the ancient and medieval worlds today, through consideration of the re-use of buildings for different functions, the role of monuments, disputes about restitution of works of art from museums, and similar issues. Format: two weekly lectures and once a week discussion sessions in the Cleveland Museum of Art will provide time to look at and discuss art works and review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing.  Requirements: Three short papers, a group project, a final examination and participation in discussions and assignments in the small group sessions. Texts: articles and links to videos and webpages will be posted on Canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANEE/ARTH 315/415

ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF ANCIENT EGYPT AND MESOPOTAMIA

T/TH 11:30-12:45

PROF. MEGAN STRONG

The golden mask of Tutankhamun, the imposing Ishtar Gate, delicately carved ivories, and expertly chiseled stone sculpture; works from Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia are some of the most captivating examples of visual culture from the ancient world. This course will emphasize the examination of art and architecture of Egypt and Mesopotamia in context, focusing on material from prehistory through the 6th century BC. We will explore the deep connection between art, religion, and the worldview of Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, in addition to the meaning and audience for art, the principles which guided art production, trends in media and themes over time, and the relationship of writing and art. We will also consider the interaction between Egyptian and Mesopotamian art, museums, and the modern artistic and political landscapes.

 

 

 

 

Nefertari offering to Hathor, ca. 1250 BC; Tomb of Nefertari (QV66), Valley of the Queens, Luxor

 

 

 

 

 

HUMN/ARTH 316/416

PUBLIC HUMANITIES AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

T/TH 10-11:15

PROF. ERIN BENAY

 Who has access to knowledge and why? How is knowledge produced and publicized? What and where is the public? Who is included and excluded in this public?  What is the role of art and culture in various publics? This innovative new course will address these questions as it introduces students to the theories and methods of the Public Humanities and Civic Engagement. Broadly defined, Public Humanities works to engage diverse publics in the subjects of the humanities by making topics like art history, literary history, film, and theater, accessible and understandable to a wider civic audience, but it also interrogates the concept of the expert and seeks to find experts in the field, rather than exclusively in the academy.  Through a combination of reading, discussion, and virtual (or in person) visits from leaders of Cleveland-area organizations, administrators, legislators, and public historians, this course will teach you how to put your degrees to work for the greater good! Although this course is about Public Humanities & Civic Engagement, it is open to students in all fields across the university who or are interested in ways to integrate the community in their education and to think creatively about the types of work their academic training prepares them to do. Undergraduate and graduate students will benefit from opportunities to broaden their professional networks and to learn more about the kinds of skills that are necessary in professions across the disciplines.

 

 

 

 

CLSC/ARTH 333/433 GREEK AND ROMAN PAINTING:

ANCIENT GREEK VASE-PAINTING, C. 900-300 BC

T/TH. 10:00-11:15 AM

PROF. SETH PEVNICK, CURATOR OF GREEK AND ROMAN ART, CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART

This course will explore Greek painted pottery produced between c. 900-300 BC, a time of great artistic and cultural change stretching from the Geometric through the Archaic and Classical periods. Greek vases were created as functional objects – especially for wine, water, and oil – and were never considered the highest art form of their time. They survive in vast numbers, however, including ceramic masterpieces decorated with scenes drawn from ancient mythology as well as daily life. Moreover, thanks to decades of close study by generations of scholars (most notably Sir John Beazley), the names and artistic identities of hundreds of potters and black-figure and red-figure vase-painters are now known, especially from Athens in the sixth and fifth centuries BC. These range from conventionally named painters such as the Berlin Painter and his (or her) student the Achilles Painter to those who signed their work, such as Nikosthenes and Douris (both represented in the Cleveland Museum of Art collection). Fewer names are known from other parts of ancient Greece, or from neighboring regions of present-day Italy and Turkey, but workshops and artistic personalities in these areas have also been well reconstructed. In addition to exploring this long and diverse history of artistic production, we will also consider related aspects, from ancient merchants and consumers to modern discovery, collecting, and study. If possible under Cleveland Museum of Art visitor guidelines, classes will include close looking at multiple objects, both in the galleries and in the Art Study Room.

 

 

 

 

Red-Figure Eye Cup: Warriors (A), Musician and Youths (B), c. 520 BC. Attributed to Psiax (Greek, Attic, active c. 525-505 BC), and the Group of Leipzig T 3599. Ceramic; 11.2 x 33.6 cm; diameter of rim 26 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, Purchase from the J. H. Wade Fund 1976.89.

 

 

 

 

ARTH 367/467  

17th and 18th CENTURY FRENCH ART   

M/W 12:45-2:00

PROF. CATHERINE SCALLEN

Louis XIV, the “Sun King,” and his palace complex at Versailles; the changing function of art works with the rise of consumer culture; the rise of Rococo decorative arts; the importance women patrons and painters. This was a time of tremendous social and political change, reflected in the arts. These are some of the topics we will consider as we survey the arts of painting and printmaking, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture in France from 1600 to the eve of revolution in 1789. Lectures and discussions will focus on the social and political uses of art and architecture, stylistic developments, patronage, the art market and collecting. Format: lectures, class discussions, and gallery visits to the CMA collections. Requirements for 367 two short critiques of articles, one research project culminating in an oral presentation and a paper. Requirements for 467: same basic requirements as 367; graduate students will also write additional critiques, lead a class discussion, and write a longer research paper. Texts: all readings will be taken from exhibition catalogues, books and scholarly journals and uploaded to Canvas. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTH 374/474

IMPRESSIONISM TO SYMBOLISM

T/TH 1-2:15

PROF. ANDREA RAGER

Although the Impressionists exhibited as a group for only twelve years, the movement they inaugurated would forever change the course of French art, sending out shock waves that continue to reverberate today.  While public attitude has shifted from one of skepticism to adulation, the movement has also been widely chronicled by critics and scholars engaging in fierce debates over their significance in the history of art.  This class will consider the movement in its broadest sense, including its precursor in Realism, as well as the subsequent rise of Symbolism and Post-Impressionism.  We will adopt a thematic approach, which will include topics such as: the avant-garde as art historical phenomenon; science, color theory, and innovations in painting technique; gender divisions, sexuality, and performance; fashion and the commodity culture of the spectacle; politics, class conflict, and the changing urban fabric of Paris; industrialism, leisure, and the landscape; international exhibitions, globalization, and imperialism; and the decorative as artistic strategy.  Artists will include Gustave Courbet, Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Mary Cassatt, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas, Gustave Caillebotte, Auguste Rodin, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh, Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, Odilon Redon, and Paul Cezanne, among others.  Classes will regularly meet at the Cleveland Museum of Art, where we will study not only paintings, but also sculpture, photography, works on paper, and the decorative arts.

Course Requirements for 374: Two short papers on objects in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, two in-class presentations, and one final project (choice between a research paper or an exhibition proposal).

Course Requirements for 474: Graduate students will be expected to complete all of the above, plus additional weekly readings, to serve as discussion leader for one class, to attend bi-weekly graduate meetings, and to a complete a final project of greater length.

Required Texts: Mary Tomkins Lewis, ed., Critical Readings in Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (UC Press, 2007) ISBN-10: 0520250222; I

SBN-13: 978-0520250222

Belinda Thomson, Impressionism: Origins, Practice, Reception (Thames & Hudson, 2000). ISBN-10: 0500203350; ISBN-13: 978-0500203354

Additional required readings will be posted to Canvas or available on reserve at Ingalls Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henri-Edmond Cross, The Pink Cloud, c.1896, oil on canvas, 54.6 x 61 cm

Nancy F. and Joseph P. Keithley Collection Gift 2020.106 Cleveland Museum of Art

 

 

 

 

ARTH 397/497

CONTEMPORARY ART IN EAST ASIA

T/TH 2:30-4:45

PROF. EUNYOUNG PARK

This course will explore contemporary art and visual culture in East Asia produced since the mid-twentieth century with a focus on major artistic movements and artists active in China, Japan, and Korea. Encountering complicated geopolitical and socioeconomic conditions in the post-war era, a series of experimental and radical artistic, cultural, political movements have emerged in East Asia. The course will map the critical topographies of Asian art from 1945 to the 1980s through the exploration of the following: post-war art and experimental art in Japan and Korea, Chinese art during the Cultural Revolution, material culture in Japanese Mono-ha and Korean Dansaekhwa, and art of resistance in China and Korea in the 1980s. The course will also investigate contemporary Asian art and visual culture focusing on its global turn from the late 1980s. Fueled by international geopolitical change, economic boom, and the impact of globalization, art in Asia or by Asian artists has gained a high level of international visibility and taken a central position in contemporary art exhibitions and art criticism. This visual, social, and theoretical development in the recent art in Asia will be examined through key issues and themes: art’s revisiting of tradition and history, its exploration of body and identity, the impact of consumerism and popular culture, and its engagement with public space and the urban environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KIM Beom, A Rock That Was Taught It Was a Bird, 2010. Stone, wood, wooden table, single channel video on 12-inch flat monitor (1 hr, 27 min, 30 sec; edition 1/3). Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

ARTH 395                                                                                                       

INTERNSHIP                                                                                                    

This course is designated for undergraduate students seeking professional experience in art history.  It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation.  Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship.  Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

 

ARTH 398                                                                                                       

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY      

Individual research reports on special topics.  Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

 

ARTH 399                                                                                                       

HONORS THESIS                                                                                            

 Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

 

 

ARTH 490                                                                                                       

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS

TUESDAY 1-3:30

PROF. HENRY ADAMS

In order to exist, a museum must provide practical answers to philosophical questions.  What is a work of art?  What is a masterpiece?  How does the context in which an artwork is placed affect its meaning?  What sort of history do works of art provide? What should an art museum collect and what should it exclude?  What is the social and educational role of a museum and what audience should it serve?  We will explore these questions both through learning about the history of art collecting and art museums, and also through exploring the Cleveland Museum of Art and other museums on University Circle, and meeting with some of the people who work in them.

 

ARTH 491 A & B                                                                                             

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP                                               

PROF. HOLLY WITCHEY

 Consent of supervising Professor.  Prerequisite:  ARTH 490

 

ARTH 494 (A-F)                                                                                              

DIRECTED READINGS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings BEFORE registering.

 A: Non-Western Art

B:  Ancient Art

C: Medieval Art

D: Renaissance and Baroque Art

Baroque Art

E: American Art

F: Modern Art

 

 ARTH 495                                                                                           

METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY

WEDNESDAY 2:15-4:45

PROF. ANDREA RAGER

ARTH 495 is a writing- and discussion-intensive methodology course, open only to first-year graduate students in the department. Besides offering a synoptic view of critical theory and something of a smorgasbord of various art historical methodologies, the course will focus on sharpening students’ abilities to look and read critically; to do research effectively; to write and edit research papers; to understand and use the many tools of art historical analysis; to use sophisticated art historical vocabulary (as opposed to jargon); and to construct successful oral presentations. This is not a survey of art history’s history or a comprehensive overview of every method available to art historians. The larger goal of this course is to engage students with new ways of thinking and writing about art and its history.

 

 

ARTH 496 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF WORKS OF ART

FRIDAY 2-4:30

PROF. HEATHER GALLOWAY

This course will introduce students to the examination methods, terminology, ethics and goals of art conservation as it supports art historical research and practice.  We will explore the materials and construction of cultural artifacts looking for commonalities across media and cultures.  Assignments will focus on finding ways to describe and understand the physical object, the appearance of aging materials and the degree to which that alteration is or is not accepted.  As much as is possible, the class will be taught from the collections on display at the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) so that the students become familiar with reading the evidence of manufacture and condition in their direct study of art.   These observations will be augmented by in-class visits to conservation labs at the CMA to examine objects closely and to engage in discussions with conservators on how their treatment interventions affect what we see including their approaches to aesthetic compensation.

Readings:  Course readings will consist of articles and chapters of books that will be placed on reserve in the Ingalls Library at the CMA and/or posted on Canvas as PDFs.  Course Requirements:  Active participation in class discussions; one (1-2page) ungraded visual analysis of materials and structure and one longer technical research paper (12-15page) both based on objects in the CMA collection; consultation with CMA staff conservators with a knowledge base applicable to the research paper; and an in-class presentation based on that research.

 

 

ARTH 545

SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART: ART AND CULTURE OF HILDESHEIM AND ITS CONTEXTS 1000-1250

WEDNESDAY 10-12:30

GERHARD LUTZ, ROBERT P. BERGMAN CURATOR OF MEDIEVAL ART, CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART

 The episcopal city of Hildesheim in northern Germany was one of the most important centers of Central Europe between about 1000 and 1250.  It was home to a host of extraordinary medieval objects, such as the bronze doors of the cathedral, as well an innovative building, such as the monastery church of St. Michael.  This seminar will focus on the most important works of art of this period, especially the field of architecture, sculpture, and treasure art, linking them to their contemporary historical, intellectual, spiritual, and economic contexts in Europe.  Throughout, we will study firsthand outstanding objects of Hildesheim provenance in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

Art Reliquary of the Apostles, c. 1190, Germany, Lower Saxony, Hildesheim, Romanesque period, late 12th century

 

 

 

ARTH 565

COLLECTION SEMINAR IN MUSEUM STUDIES – LOST NARRATIVES: MATERIALITY, MARGINALIZATION, AND WOMEN’S AGENCY IN MUSEUMS

FRIDAY 1:00-3:30

PROF. HOLLY WITCHEY

With the permanent collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) as our starting point, this class will explore the impact and significance of women as creators, collectors, curators, educators, and philanthropists. We will look at the CMA’s collections of lace, tapestries, Native North American materials, decorative arts and embroideries—collections once sought after that are seldom displayed—and consider the implications and consequences of lost narratives and non-display.

Each session will include discussions in the galleries of the Cleveland Museum of Art looking for evidence of women’s participation in the process of creating an art museum. Each student will choose a topic of interest and the discovery process will take the student beyond the galleries and curatorial files and into library, archival, and genealogical resources. Students will explore the nature of craft and the role of the maker in order to better understand the issues involved in interpretation, conservation and preservation of collections.

The course will include presentations by scholars, curators, conservators, and practicing artists, and students will participate in a two-day field trip to the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Cranbrook Educational Community just outside Detroit. As part of the series of Mellon Foundation graduate collection seminars, this course will result in a charette to consider innovative ways to provide visitors with a richer understanding of the links between marginalized collections and the untold stories of women who helped create collections and museums.

  

ARTH 601                                                                                                        

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY 

List name of supervising Professor.

 

ARTH 610A                                                                                                     

ADVANCED MUSEUM STUDIES INTERNSHIP

List name of supervising Professor

 

ARTH 701                                                                                                       

DISSERTATION PhD

List name of supervising Professor.