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ARTH 150

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE UNIVERSE AND TO THE MEANING OF EVERYTHING 

PROF. HENRY ADAMS, PROF. HARSH MATHUR (PHYSICS)

MW 3:20pm – 4:35pm

This class will bring an interdisciplinary approach to the big questions of human existence of thought, what it means to search for truth or meaning, and the development of our tools for examining these questions such as science, mathematics, engineering, philosophy and art.

The course will be anchored in lectures by the two primary instructors but will also feature a large cast of guest lecturers representing not only many departments of the College of Arts and Sciences but also other schools and colleges at the University as well as neighboring institutions such as the Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural History. Although the course will be open to students at all levels, a major goal
of the course is to introduce first year students to the extraordinary intellectual resources of this University and its affiliated institutions.

ARTH 102

ART HISTORY II

PROF. ERIN BENAY 

M/W/F 10:35am – 11:25am

This course takes a broad view of the history of art, tracing major developments from the 14th century to the present in Europe and America, as well as examining aspects of African and Asian art. In this class we will discuss key artists, objects and movements, with special emphasis on painting, sculpture, architecture, the decorative arts, and print media.
These works will be studied in their social and historical contexts, with consideration of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique, and aesthetics. We will also discuss various methodological approaches to the history of art, including gender studies, Marxism, post-colonialism, and globalization. This course asks students to consider
whose stories are told in classes like this one, and whose are omitted. This class will take advantage of the rich collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, with weekly sessions in the galleries. No prerequisites are necessary!

ARTH 230/CLSC 230 

ANCIENT ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE: POWER, POLITICS, AND DIVERSITY

PROF. MAGGIE POPKIN

T/TH: 10:00 – 11:15 am

This course explores the history of ancient Roman art and architecture, with a particular emphasis on the Roman Empire. We will focus on situating objects and monuments in the changing historical, cultural, political, and religious contexts of the Roman world. The course will introduce students to famous buildings such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon in Rome, but we will also look at lesser known but equally fascinating works that offer insight into the imaginations, aspirations, and identities of the Roman Empire’s diverse population. From statues and paintings to oil lamps with erotic scenes, drinking cups with images of famous athletes, and even travel souvenirs, Romans were surrounded by images and objects that allowed them to participate in but also shape and resist a broader imperial culture.

Students will consider how art and architecture shaped the complex ways that people living in the Roman world related to the empire and to more regional and local cultural traditions from Egypt and North Africa, Northern Europe, and the Near East. Finally, we will also examine how the legacy of Roman art and architecture continues to fuel debates about power, politics, and representation in the United States, including controversies over Confederate monuments. Students will examine works of art in person in the Cleveland Museum of Art’s ancient art galleries and will visit the CMA’s Art Study Room to handle works of art themselves. We will also visit other sites such as Lakeview Cemetery. There are no prerequisites for this course other than curiosity and an open mind! Please contact Professor Maggie Popkin (mlp84@case.edu) with any questions.

ARTH 280

MODERN ART AND MODERN WORLD 

PROF. EUNYOUNG PARK 

T/TH 1:00pm – 2:15pm

This course will explore the development of modern art, primarily the art of Europe and the United States, from the late 18th to the mid-20th century.

Tracing key art movements and the careers of significant artists from France, Germany, Italy, Russia, the Netherlands, and the United States, this course will not only examine innovations in style, materials, technique, subject matter, and theory in modern art history, but will also analyze issues related to the rise of new social classes, industrialization and technological development, as well as changes to the urban environment and the development of popular culture in modern society.

Through the examination of artists’ responses to technological, cultural, social, and political changes, this course will explore the emergence and development of “modernity” and “modernism” in Western art. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) will form an integral part of the course.

 

 

 

 

ARTH 305/405

PRESSING MATTERS

PROF. ERIN BENAY 

W 2:15pm – 4:45pm

Cheap, reproducible, and easy to disseminate, prints have been made on paper and other materials for more than 1000 years. In this course, we will study the history of printmaking, paying particularly close attention to the ways that the print medium has engendered social, political, and racial identity throughout its history. The Cleveland Museum of Art is home to an astounding collection of prints and the curators of the Prints and Drawings department will support the course with access to the collection via the Art Study Room. Students will also learn the methods and techniques used by printmakers from early modernity (c. 1500) to the present day, and will interrogate the ways that technological advancements have impacted the circulation of printed visual materials amongst diverse populations. Rather than write a final research paper, however, students will simultaneously be engaged with our community partner organization, Zygote Press, and will work on the design of a community-based program and attendant curriculum for under-resourced youth in East Cleveland. Students in the course will work with Zygote to establish precisely how these programs should be delivered. This real-world problem-solving project will press students to think creatively and critically about how art works in the world and about the way that art history may be put into the service of the city at large.

ARTH 382/482/ESTD 382

ART AND THE ENVIRONMENT 

PROF. ANDREA RAGER

TR 2:30pm – 3:45pm

As issues of sustainability and environmental impact have become increasingly dominant concerns in contemporary society, eco-criticism has emerged as a vital methodological thread across the humanities.

Motivated by ethical as well as scholarly concerns, eco-criticism not only enacts a fundamental examination of nature as an ideological construct, but also seeks to investigate the complex interrelationship between humanity and the environment.

Concurrently, there has been a marked interest in studying the role of “green issues” in contemporary art, particularly in tracing the development of earth art or eco-art from the early 1970s to the present.

The goal of this seminar is to forge a link between these two emergent strands by tracing the complex relationship between art and the environment from the early nineteenth-century to the present, seeking to thereby assess the capaciousness of ecocriticism as a methodological approach to art history.

ARTH 396

MAJORS SEMINAR: MUSEUMS AND THE LEGACY OF EMPIRE

PROF. ANDREA RAGER

TR 11:30am – 12:45pm

Combining an overview of methodological approaches to art history with pressing current issues and debates in the contemporary art world, this course will focus on the legacy of the British and French empires from the eighteenth century to today. This class will devote particular attention to exploring objects from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, tracing the complex and often fraught legacy of British and French imperialism and colonialism across the globe.

We will investigate the explicit and implicit networks of exchange, power, and resistance that operate through and around a diverse selection of works from a range of media, time periods, and geographical locations. We will consider not only objects produced under the aegis of British and French imperial authority, but also the complex provenance of objects in the museum that circulated through imperial channels. We will consider the ethics of curatorial stewardship and the responsibility to museum audiences in addressing the legacy of colonialism, as well as the impact of postcolonial theory and decolonization on art history. This class will culminate in a public project produced by the students as a group reflecting on the themes of the course. This course fulfils the SAGES Capstone requirement for all undergraduate Art History majors.

ARTS 300/400

ART FOR DIFFERENT FUTURES

PROF. STEVEN CIAMPAGLIA

W 01:00pm-04:00pm

The movements for social justice (Black Lives Matter, Me Too) are rapidly and dynamically altering long-held conceptions about the role of art in society. The culture industries (along with many other sectors) have been forced to re-examine the viability and utility of their current models, and the assumptions these models are predicated upon.

Art institutions are in the process of reconciling their complicated and often contradictory relationship with white, sexist, ableist, and classist ideology, in which they have tacitly perpetuated dominant structures and perspectives while rhetorically advocating for reform and radical change.

In this course, we will explore this contemporary cultural moment and unravel the seismic changes that have brought uncertainty to the art world.

We will speculate potential futures free of racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, and classism, and the role that art could play within those possible futures. And we will explore alternative models of artmaking with the potential to instigate those futures through a focus on social engagement, community, and radical inclusion.

ARTH 361/461

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ART IN BELGIUM AND THE NETHERLANDS

PROF. CATHERINE SCALLEN 

T/TH 10am-11:15am

In this course we discuss and analyze painting and the graphic arts in Belgium and The Netherlands in relationship to political, social, cultural, and religious contexts. Why did new subjects in art, such as scenes of everyday life, landscapes, and still lifes, become so popular?  How did the first large-scale open art market in Europe affect the production of art?  How did the aftermath of the Protestant Reformation affect art in the Roman Catholic kingdom Spanish Netherlands (Belgium) and the Protestant Republic of the United Provinces (The Netherlands)? Why did some artists seek out international careers, and others very local ones?  We will explore the careers and art works of individual artists such as Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, Frans Hals, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Johannes Vermeer.

Text to purchase: Mariët Westermann, A Worldly Art: The Dutch Republic 1585-1718, New Haven 2005; ISBN-13: 978-0300107234.  The other course readings will consist of articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues that will uploaded to Canvas.

Requirements for 361: Two evaluative abstracts of articles read for class discussion; participation in an exhibition project with  individual and group research components, presented orally and in writing; participation in class discussions, and a take-home final examination.

Requirements for 461:  Three evaluative abstracts of assigned readings; additional course readings; participation in discussions; 15-20-page final research paper, and a take-home final examination.

ARTH 490B

VISUAL ARTS & MUSEUMS II

PROF. HOLLY WITCHEY

F 2:15pm – 4:45pm

ARTH 491B

INTERNSHIP

TBA

T/TH 10am-11:15am

ARTH 494F

MODERN ART

TBA

F 2:15pm – 4:45pm

ARTH 512

SEMINAR IN ANCIENT ART

PROF. MAGGIE POPKIN 

T 11:30am – 2:00pm

ARTH 530

BYZANTINE VISUAL CULTURE 

PROF. ELIZABETH BOLMAN

T 4:00pm – 6:30pm

ARTH 545

SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART

PROF. ELINA GERTSMAN/PROF. MCCORMICK

W 11:40am – 2:00pm