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JANUARY SESSION:  JANUARY 8-29

ARTH 102

Angelica Verduci

M-F 9am-11:20am

E1

 This course takes a broad view of the history of art, tracing major developments from the 14th century to the present in Europe and America, as well as examining aspects of African and Asian art. In this class we will discuss key artists, objects and movements, with special emphasis on painting, sculpture, architecture, the decorative arts, and print media. These works will be studied in their social and historical contexts, with consideration of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique, and aesthetics.

 

FEBRUARY 1-MAY 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTH 395

AS ARRANGED

INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

 

ARTH 398 

AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

STAFF

Individual research and reports on special topics.  Consent of Professor.

 

ARTH 399

AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS                                 

STAFF

Consent of Department Chair.  List name of supervising Professor

 

ARTH 489

AS ARRANGED

MA QUALIFYING PAPER                                                                                                    

STAFF

Graduating Art History (ARH) Masters students only

 

ARTH 490B VISUAL ART AND MUSEUMS: FINDING AND MAKING MEANING IN THE 21ST CENTURY ART MUSEUM

Prof. Holly Witchey

Friday 10-12:30

P

 This course is the second semester of a two-semester examination of the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. The art museum is a rich topic; this course focuses on collecting, exhibiting, and interpretation practice in the United States with some forays into museums on other continents for comparative purposes. As a result of this course, students will be familiar with the following topics:

  • The historical development of the museum, from its origins in private collecting practices to its modern incarnation as an institution serving diverse audiences
  • The development and care of a collection, including acquisition, cataloguing conservation, display, and housing of individual objects
  • The study and interpretation of the collection/exhibition, considering diverse publics
  • The role of the museum professional in the workplace and in the governance of an institution that cares for material culture including project management, finance, and administration

Through the study of these topics, the student should be familiar with the following concepts:

  • The museum as a place for:

o   community conversations

o   learning & research

o   invention and innovation

  • Museum professionals as:

o   representatives of trusted institutions

o   stewards of material culture

o   subject to legal and ethical guidelines

As a result of studying with the course topics and concepts outlined above, students should be prepared to undertake a professional-level internship.  In addition, through course assignments, students will gain proficiency in written and verbal expression and deepen skills in critical thinking, analysis, and problem-solving. While the acquisition of foreign language skills lies outside the scope of this course, students are nonetheless encouraged to develop their skills in this arena in order to read and interpret foreign language materials often associated with objects and museum projects.

 

 

ARTH 494 A-F

DIRECTED READINGS

Independent Study

Consent of professor

 

ARTH 496 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF WORKS OF ART

Thursday 1:00-3:30

Prof. Heather Galloway

E3

 We will explore the materials and construction of art through the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA), with a view to finding a common language of material technology.  The course will introduce students to the examination methods, terminology and goals of art conservation as it supports art historical research and practice.  We will discuss how materials change, the degree to which we culturally accept this, and how conservators weigh these factors in making treatment decisions.  As much as possible, the class will be taught from the collections on display at the museum so that the students become familiar with evidence of manufacture and condition in their direct study of objects.   These observations will be augmented by in-class visits to conservation labs at the CMA to engage in discussions with the conservators.

 

 

ARTH 552: SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN NORTHERN EUROPEAN ART:  REMBRANDT 360°

Tuesday 1-3:30

Prof. Catherine Scallen

E1

Rembrandt van Rijn is the colossus of seventeenth-century Dutch art, who has been featured in nearly all exhibitions of the art of this era and has served as the focus of nearly endless scholarly and popular studies. Yet monographic studies are considered old-fashioned and irrelevant by some art historians as too narrow and unrepresentative. How do we resolve this seeming contradiction? If we examine recent Rembrandt scholarship, we will see that approaches such as the global and material turns and art market studies have sought to understand not just Rembrandt’s singularity, but ways in which he can be seen to exemplify shared aspects of Dutch art and culture of the seventeenth century. This seminar will consider this expanded approach, while it will also provide an overview to his artistic production in three media, and consider the age-old question in art history: to what extent is biography relevant to the work produced by an artist?  Requirements: seminar participants will write research papers. and present their research to the seminar in oral presentations. They are expected to be regular participants in the weekly seminar discussions and will help lead at least one discussion as well.

 

 

ARTH 565 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART: UNCIVIL WARS IN THE ART WORLD

Friday 2:15-4:45

Professor Henry Adams

E1

A look at social and artistic controversy in American art of the 20th century, going back to the Ash Can School and other radical movements, but concentrating chiefly on the controversies of the last few decades–Social Justice, Sexual Freedom, Feminism, Gay Rights, Native American Rights, Black Lives Matter, Iconoclasm, and many others as well.  What are the episodes that have stirred up pitched battles about the role of art–that have truly unhinged people?  How have they reshaped the art world, and American society more generally?  Can we construct a history of what has been happening?  Henry Adams is writing a book with Dennis Barrie on the Mapplethorpe trial, in which Barrie became the first museum director in American history to face a jail sentence for the art he was showing in his museum.  Dennis Barrie has agreed to make some guest appearances for the class.

 

 

ARTH 570: SEMINAR IN 19TH-CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

FROM PRE-RAPHAELITISM TO AESTHETICISM: ART AND MODERNITY IN VICTORIAN BRITAIN

Prof. Andrea Rager

W 12:45-3:15

E1 

In recent years, a wealth of new scholarship has emerged not only contextualizing Pre-Raphaelitism, Aestheticism, and the Arts & Crafts Movement within the rich visual culture of Victorian Britain, but also arguing for a reconsideration of these movements as occupying a leading role in the nineteenth-century artistic avant-garde.  Employing both primary source texts and subsequent critical scholarship, this course will survey the work of the original Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of 1848 (including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Ford Madox Brown) from their brief years of artistic cohesion through their subsequently diverging careers.  We will explore their work in relationship to contemporary technological developments (particularly photography), scientific discoveries, the social conditions of modern life, art historical revivalism, religious and political reforms, the British imperialist project, and the formation of gender identities.  We will then explore the intersection between Pre-Raphaelitism and the late-Victorian movement of Aestheticism under the rubric of “art for art’s sake,” focusing in particular on the work of Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, Walter Crane, James McNeill Whistler, and G. F. Watts.  We will also consider the relationship of the international Arts & Crafts movement to Pre-Raphaelitism, investigating the long-lasting legacy of design reform that still reverberates today.  This course will utilize the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art and other sites in the greater Cleveland area.

Required Textbooks:

Elizabeth Prettejohn, Art of the Pre-Raphaelites (Princeton, 2000) ISBN-13: 978-0691070575

ISBN-10: 0691070571

Tim Barringer, Reading the Pre-Raphaelites Revised Edition (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012) ISBN-10: 030017733X; ISBN-13: 978-0300177336

Elizabeth Prettejohn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the Pre-Raphaelites (Cambridge UP, 2012) ISBN-13: 978-0521895156; ISBN-10: 0521895154

All other required readings will either be posted to Canvas.

Course Requirements: Four in-class presentations and active class participation; two object papers; research paper.

 

 

ARTH 610B

ADVANCED MUSEUMS INTERNSHIP II

STAFF

List name of supervising Professor

 

ARTH 701                                                                                                                                        

DISSERTATION PH.D.

List name of supervising Professor.