ARTH 101                                                                                                         

PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS                                                                             

MWF 10:35-11:25

ON CAMPUS

POPKIN

This introductory survey course explores the history of world architecture and visual arts from prehistory through the late Medieval period (ca. 1400 C.E.). This course offers a broad overview of major works and emphasizes the historical and cultural contexts in which art and architecture were produced. Students will explore the functions, styles, and historical interrelationships of individual works of art and architecture. Study of a diverse range of objects will also help students understand aspects of the various cultures that produced them, as well as the relevance of these works of art and the cultures that produced them to our own culture. Students also learn the basic vocabulary and methods of art history as a discipline in preparation for more advanced art history courses. Students will learn skills including visual analysis and historical interpretation of works of art and architecture.

Egyptian Pyramids

 

ARTH 280

MODERN ART AND MODERN SCIENCE

M/W 12:45-2:00

PARK

 

This course will explore the development of modern art, primarily the art of Europe and the United States, from the late 18th to the mid 20th century. Tracing key art movements and the careers of significant artists, this course will not only examine innovations in style, materials, technique, subject matter, and theory in modern art history, but also analyze issues related to the rise of new social classes, industrialization and technological development, changes to the urban environment, and the development of popular culture in modern society. Through the examination of artists’ responses to technological, cultural, social, and political changes, this course will explore the emergence and development of “modernity” and “modernism” in Western art. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art will form an integral part of the course.

Required textbook: H. H. Arnason & Elizabeth C. Mansfield’s History of Modern Art: Painting Sculpture Architecture Photography (7th ed., 2013). Additional readings will be available as PDF files on the course website.  Assignments: in-class midterm exam, final exam, reading responses, and two short papers on objects in the collection of the CMA.

Severinis-Paris-Subway-Ferris-Wheel-and-Eiffel-Tower

Gino Severini, Paris Subway, Ferris Wheel and Eiffel Tower, 1912-1913 (CMA)

ARTH 260
ART IN THE AGE OF GRANDEUR
T/TH 1-2:15
CMA CLASSROOM A
SCALLEN

The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in western and central Europe were a time of great artistic innovation and creativity; they also represent a period of significant change and upheaval in European societies. As we look at the major monuments of architecture, painting, and sculpture in Italy, France, Spain, Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, Austria, and England, we will consider such issues as: how did the arts serve nation building and political symbolism? How were religious reforms reflected in works of art? What role did the rising middle class play as patrons of art? Where did open art markets develop and why? Where did commissioned art works still dominate? Among the artists studied will be: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Poussin, Watteau, Velazquez, Zurbaran, Hogarth. We will look at major building projects in Rome, Paris, and Versailles.  Course goals include greater understanding of the societies and cultures of this period in Europe, enhanced ability to read and assess scholarly literature in art history, sharpened writing and speaking skills. Format: course lectures and in-class discussion of readings.

Requirements: two 3-4 page papers, one brief class presentation, in-class mid-term examination, take-home final examination, and active participation in class discussions.  No textbook.

Dycks-Portrait-of-Charles-I

Anthony van Dyck Equestrian Portrait of Charles I, 1633,  Great Britain Royal Collection

 

ARTH 329/429 (CLSC 329)
MARVELS OF ROME: MONUMENTS AND THEIR DECORATION IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
M/W 2:15-3:30
ON CAMPUS
POPKIN

This course examines some of the most famous monuments of the Roman Empire, including Nero’s Golden House, the Colosseum, the Pantheon, Hadrian’s Villa at Tivoli, and the lavish villa of Piazza Armerina in Sicily. We will study each monument in depth, delving into the architecture, paintings, sculptures, mosaics, and social functions of each monument. Students will learn how to analyze artistic and archaeological evidence, ancient textual evidence (poems, prose, and inscriptions), and secondary scholarship to reconstruct the visual appearances and historical and cultural contexts of the monuments in questions. Throughout the course, students will gain a new appreciation and deeper understanding of some of the most iconic buildings of the classical tradition, as well as the role of architecture and concepts of monumentality in Roman society.

Interior-view-of-the-Pantheon

ARTH 354/454
ART OF THE GOLBAL RENAISSANCE
T/TH 10-11:15
CMA CLASSROOM E
BENAY

As a result of Roman Catholic missions to Africa and Asia, colonial occupation in Latin America, and mercantile trade with the Ottoman empire, European artists and patrons developed increasingly complex modes of cultural production in the early modern period. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach that encompasses art, anthropology, history, and literature, this course reassesses the geographic parameters of the Renaissance and asks students to consider what words like ‘native’ and ‘foreign’ might have meant in the 15th-17th centuries. Course readings will be available on Canvas. Requirements: a series of short, critical reflection papers; a longer 12-15 pg. research paper, and active participation in class discussions and group activities. Separate requirements will apply to graduate students.

Sapi-Portuguese-Lidded-Saltcellar

Sapi-Portuguese Lidded Saltcellar, 15th-16th century, Ivory, Sierra-Leone, Metropolitan Museum of Art

ARTH 360/460
RENAISSANCE ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE Ca. 1400-1585
T/TH 10-11:15
CMA CLASSROOM A
SCALLEN

The visual arts of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries participated in the widespread social and political changes in northern Europe in what is today Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, and France.  In this course we will examine both the work of pioneering individual artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer and Pieter Bruegel, and larger themes such as patronage and the rise of the art market, the invention and dissemination of prints, the development of new subjects in art (landscapes, scenes of daily life) and the use of art for political propaganda and religious devotion. Course goals include enhanced ability to read and assess scholarly literature in art history and sharpened writing and speaking skills.

Requirements for 360:  Midterm and final examinations, two critiques of articles read for class discussion, a research project culminating in a series of short papers, oral presentations on the research project, participation in class discussions.

Requirements for 460:  Midterm and final examinations, three critiques of articles read for class discussion, a research paper of 15-18 pages, oral presentations on the research project, participation in class discussions.    Graduate students will also lead one class discussion.

Course readings will consist of articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues that will be scanned and uploaded to Canvas wherever possible.

Albrecht-Durer-Self-Portrait

 Albrecht Dürer Self Portrait 1500 Munich Alte Pinakothek

ARTH 379/479
ISSUES IN 19TH CENTURY ART: VICTORIAN AVANT-GARDE: PRE-RAPHAELITES, AESTHETICISM, AND THE ARTS & CRAFTS MOVEMENT
T/TH 2:30-3:45
CMA CLASSROOM A
RAGER

In recent years, a wealth of new scholarship has emerged not only contextualizing Pre-Raphaelitism, Aestheticism, and the Arts & Crafts Movement within the rich visual culture of Victorian Britain, but also arguing for a reconsideration of these movements as occupying a leading role in the nineteenth-century artistic avant-garde.  Employing both primary source texts and subsequent critical scholarship, this course will survey the work of the original Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of 1848 (including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Ford Madox Brown) from their brief years of artistic cohesion through their subsequently diverging careers.  We will explore their work in relationship to contemporary technological developments (particularly photography), scientific discoveries, the social conditions of modern life, art historical revivalism, religious and political reforms, the British imperialist project, and the formation of gender identities.  We will then explore the intersection between Pre-Raphaelitism and the late-Victorian movement of Aestheticism under the rubric of “art for art’s sake,” focusing in particular on the work of Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, Walter Crane, James McNeill Whistler, and G. F. Watts.  We will also consider the relationship of the international Arts & Crafts movement to Pre-Raphaelitism, investigating the long lasting legacy of design reform that still reverberates today.  This course will include frequent visits to the galleries and Art Study Room of the Cleveland Museum of Art, including the exhibition William Morris: Designing an Earthly Paradise.  We will also incorporate sites around Cleveland, including Louis Comfort Tiffany’s window and mosaics for Wade Chapel.

Required Textbook: Tim Barringer, Reading the Pre-Raphaelites (Revised Edition, Yale University Press, 2012) ISBN-10: 030017733X; ISBN-13: 978-0300177336Required Textbooks for 479/Recommended 379: Elizabeth Prettejohn, The Art of the Pre-Raphaelites (Princeton University Press, 2000) ISBN-10: 0691070571; ISBN-13: 978-0691070575

Additional required readings will be posted as PDFs to Canvas

Course Requirements for 379: oral presentation; three short object papers; choice of final research paper or exhibition proposal; participation in class discussion

Course Requirements for 479: Graduate students will be responsible for all of the above, plus additional weekly readings and bi-weekly meetings, and to serve as discussion leader for one class.

Burne-Jones The Garden Court

Edward Burne-Jones, The Garden Court, 1870-75, graphite and watercolour, heightened with white gouache, Cleveland Museum of Art, 1994.197

ARTH 393/493
CONTEMPORARY ART: CRITICAL DIRECTIONS
M/W/F 2:15-3:05
PARK

The art world has undergone radical changes over the past three decades, and contemporary artists have critically engaged with these cultural, social, economic, technological, and environmental changes in their works. Examining art from the 1980s to the present, this course will investigate how changes in socio-cultural and discursive spaces have impacted specific aspects of contemporary art and how contemporary artists have responded through their works and practices. This course will be thematically organized analyzing issues of identity, gender, history, time and space, popular culture, technology, institutions, globalization, and audience. This course will also introduce artists from different geographic and cultural backgrounds and cover a wide range of artistic practices—painting, sculpture, installation art, architecture, photography, video, performance, and multi-media work. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art, FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art, and MOCA Cleveland will form an integral part of the course.

Readings: Eleanor Heartney’s Art & Today (London: Phaidon Press, 2008). Additional readings will be available as PDF files on the course website.  Assignments: an exam, exhibition review, reading responses, research paper, and presentation.

Gobers Untitled

Robert Gober, Untitled, 1990 (CMA)

ARTH 395
INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for undergraduate students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 399
HONORS THESIS
AS ARRANGED

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 490A
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS
TUESDAY 2:30-5:00
CMA LIBRARY SEMINAR ROOM
ADAMS

This course examines the theory and practice of museums, primarily in the United States. Two courses, over the course of two semesters, taken during a student’s first year of graduate study, will survey the key historical and current issues facing art museums institutions, though other types of collecting and non-collecting institutions will be discussed.
During the first semester (ARTH 490A) coursework focuses on the general history of museums in the United States, the development of collections, and topics related to research, scholarship, conservation, and governance. The second semester (ARTH 490B) focuses on special exhibitions, education, interpretation, marketing, and development. The inter-connections between broad fields will be demonstrated and reinforced throughout the year.
At the end of the sequences students should be familiar with the following topics:
• The development of the art museum, from its origins in collecting practices to its modern incarnation as an institution designed to serve a multiplicity of institutional and audience needs
• The development and care of a collection including preliminary research, acquisition, cataloging, and conservation.
• The display and housing of a collection, including internal and external museum architecture
• The study and interpretation of the collection/exhibition, considering diverse publics
• The governance of the institution, including administration, finance, project management, and ethics
Through the study of these topics, the student should be familiar with the following concepts:
• The museum as a place for research, scholarship, and learning
• The museum professional’s responsibilities as a steward of material culture
• At the end of the two-course courses, students should be prepared to undertake a professional level internship. Through course assignments students will gain proficiency in written and verbal expression and deepen skills in critical thinking, analysis, and problem solving.

Arth490

 

ARTH 491 A & B
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP
WITCHEY

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F)
DIRECTED READINGS
Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings BEFORE registering.

A: Non-Western Art
B: Ancient Art
C: Medieval Art
D: Renaissance and Baroque Art
E. American Art
F. Modern Art

ARTH 495
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY
TUESDAY 11:30-2:15
CMA LIBRARY SEMINAR ROOM
GERTSMAN

This is a writing- and discussion-intensive methodology course, open only to first-year graduate students in the department. Besides offering a synoptic view of critical theory and something of a smorgasbord of various art historical methodologies, the course will focus on sharpening your abilities to look and read critically; to do research effectively; to write and edit research papers; to understand and use the many tools of art historical analysis; to use sophisticated art historical vocabulary (as opposed to jargon); and to construct successful oral presentations. The larger goal of this course is to engage you with new ways of thinking and writing about art and its history. I hope that over the course of this semester, you will realize your own voice as a writer within our field’s larger discourse. Requirements: several short papers, two types of oral presentations, research paper, participation.

ARTH-495

 

ARTH 551
MELLON COLLECTIONS SEMINAR:
AFTER MICHELANGELO: THE REBIRTH OF A RENAISSANCE MASTER
WEDNESDAY 10:35-1:05
CMA LIBRARY SEMINAR ROOM
BENAY

Michelangelo’s sculptures, paintings, and architectural projects have been the subject of artistic admiration for over 500 years. This seminar will explore Michelangelo’s legacy through prints, drawings, photographs, and statuettes in the Cleveland Museum of Art permanent collection. The course will result in an exhibition of the same title to be held in either the Prints and Drawings galleries or the Smith Foundation Gallery in the Fall of 2019. The Collections Seminar exhibition will be a companion to a major exhibition of Michelangelo drawings that will be displayed in the CMA’s Smith Foundation Hall at the same time. That show will feature a corpus of Michelangelo drawings from the Teylers Museum in Haarlem. This Collections Seminar will therefore give students the rare opportunity to study from a significant body of works by Michelangelo represented in the Teylers collection, and to in turn shape the interpretation of his legacy through the companion exhibition. As such, the two exhibitions will offer students a way to engage with Michelangelo’s own artistic production and with the ways his art has been variously imitated, emulated, and copied. The course will be taught by Professor Benay and Dr. Emily Peters, Curator of Prints and Drawings at the CMA. Requirements: students will write all of the didactic texts for the exhibition, deliver a 20 minute final presentation, and write a longer term paper based on one object in the exhibition.

Ghisis-The-Prophet-Joel

Giorgio Ghisi after Michelangelo,
The Prophet Joel, early 1570s, engraving, Cleveland Museum of Art

ARTH 545
SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART
MEDIEVAL SCULPTURE: THE MATTER OF BODY
THURSDAY 11:30-2:15
CMA LIBRARY SEMINAR ROOM

This seminar will explore the meanings and representations of the sculpted body in later medieval material culture. We will explore Romanesque and Gothic architectural sculpture (monstrous, sinful, and beatific bodies); portable sculpture (martyred, suffering, and fragmented bodies); movable / interactive/ articulated sculpture (enclosed, tormented, and unhinging bodies); funerary and macabre sculpture (dead, decomposed, and resurrected bodies); the so-called Andachtsbilder (bleeding, lactating, and mystical bodies); and the complex relationship between material and meaning (miraculous, edible, and translucent bodies). Our central concern will be the exploration of the medium and its power to entangle the corporeal and the intangible, the concept and the object. Be prepared to read about disembodied heads, roving crucifixes, and impossible hybrids, and to consider all manner of media from wood to stone to ivory to wax.

Carved-Head-of-St.-John-the-Baptist

Head of St John the Baptist, England, 1470-1490, carved, painted, and gilt alabaster

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY
List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610A AS ARRANGED
ADVANCED MUSEUM STUDIES INTERNSHIP
List name of supervising Professor

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD
List name of supervising Professor.