ARTH 102 ART HISTORY II

M/W/F 10:35-11:25 

Prof. Andrea Rager

 

This course takes a broad view of the history of art, tracing major developments from the 14th century to the present in Europe and the Americas, as well as examining key aspects of African and Asian art. In this class we will discuss significant artists, objects and movements, with special emphasis on painting, sculpture, architecture, the decorative arts, and print media. These works will be studied in their social and historical contexts, with consideration of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique, and aesthetics. We will also focus on various methodological approaches to the history of art, focusing on questions of gender, class, and globalization, questioning the formation of the canon as we trace the stories of art and its creation.  This class will take advantage of the rich collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, with regular sessions in the galleries, allowing students to acquire the skills of visual analysis through firsthand engagement with actual art objects.

Required textbook: Marilyn Stokstad’s Art History (6th edition), volume 2 (available as e-book or access through Pearson’s Revel digital platform).  Additional required readings will be posted to Canvas.

Course requirements: Two in-class exams, final exam, three short papers in response to objects in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and participation in weekly small group discussion at the CMA.

Auguste Rodin, The Thinker, 1880-81, bronze, 182.9 x 142.2 cm (Cleveland Museum of Art, 1917.42)

 

 

ARTH 271 AMERICAN ART AND CULTURE

M/W 12:45-2:00 

Prof. Henry Adams

The Cleveland Museum of Art has one of the ten best collections of American art in the United States.  Using it as a touchstone, we will survey the development of American art from the 17th century to the present, including Native American art, with particular attention to the emergence of “modern art” and “modern culture” in the 20th century.  While the class will focus mainly on painting and architecture, it will also include decorative arts, literature, popular music, photography and film.  The class will include regular tours of the American collection in the Cleveland Museum of Art.  Requirements: There will be several short writing assignments and a final paper but no final exam.

 

 

ARTH 286 INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY ART

T/TH: 1-2:15pm 

Prof. Eunyoung Park

 

This course will explore contemporary art since the 1960s by tracing key art movements and the careers of significant artists in relation to cultural, social, geopolitical, and theoretical changes. The first part of the course will investigate major artistic practices in the United States and Europe, including Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Institutional Critique, Performance Art, Feminist Art, and Activist Art, by analyzing a range of issues, such as the relationship between high art and mass culture, challenge to the idea of authorship, expansion of the institutional boundary, the impact of sociopolitical activism in the art world, and art’s relation to space and audience. The second part of the course will investigate the global shift in contemporary art that began in the late 1980s and will explore issues related to postmodernism, postcolonialism, and globalization. The second part of the course will especially introduce art from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East beyond the Euro-American centric perspective. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art will form an integral part of the course.

Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Photographs, 1965, CMA.

 

ARTH 353/453 HIGH RENAISSANCE AND MANNERISM

T/TH 2:30-3:45 

Prof. Erin Benay

 

Early Renaissance Italy was a place ripe for artistic and cultural revolution: the return of the papacy to Rome, the Venetian conquest of Constantinople, the rediscovery of Plato and Aristotle, and the beginning of empirical science redefined the social and political landscape.  In this course we will discuss the impact of these factors on the rise of later Renaissance artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.  How did new discoveries in anatomical dissection, for instance, affect artists’ rendering of the human body?  But perhaps more importantly, how did such discoveries and depictions change our understanding of what it means to be human in the first place?  Our concepts of genius, competition, and scholasticism arguably originated in this period.  Students will thus explore the role of art in the shaping of these and other key themes in early modern history. Classes will meet at the Cleveland Museum of Art and will make regular visits to the galleries of Renaissance and Baroque art. Assignments include a series of papers, a presentation, and a take-home final exam.  The textbook is available at the CWRU bookstore.

 

 

ARTH 374/474 IMPRESSIONISM TO SYMBOLISM

M/W 12:45-2:00 

Prof. Andrea Rager

 

Although the Impressionists exhibited as a group for only twelve years, the movement they inaugurated would forever change the course of French art, sending out shock waves that continue to reverberate today.  While public attitude has shifted from one of skepticism to adulation, the movement has also been widely chronicled by critics and scholars engaging in fierce debates over their significance in the history of art.  This class will consider the movement in its broadest sense, including its precursor in Realism, as well as the subsequent rise of Symbolism and Post-Impressionism.  We will adopt a thematic approach, which will include topics such as: the avant-garde as art historical phenomenon; science, color theory, and innovations in painting technique; gender divisions, sexuality, and performance; fashion and the commodity culture of the spectacle; politics, class conflict, and the changing urban fabric of Paris; industrialism, leisure, and the landscape; international exhibitions, globalization, and imperialism; and the decorative as artistic strategy.  Artists will include Gustave Courbet, Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Mary Cassatt, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas, Gustave Caillebotte, Auguste Rodin, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh, Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, and Paul Cezanne.  Classes will regularly meet at the Cleveland Museum of Art, where we will study not only paintings, but also sculpture, photography, works on paper, and the decorative arts.

Course Requirements for 374: Two short papers on objects in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, two in-class presentations, and one final project (choice between a research paper or an exhibition proposal).

Course Requirements for 474: Graduate students will be expected to complete all of the above, plus additional weekly readings, to serve as discussion leader for one class, to attend bi-weekly graduate meetings, and to a complete a final project of greater length.

Required Texts: Mary Tomkins Lewis, ed., Critical Readings in Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (UC Press, 2007) ISBN-10: 0520250222; ISBN-13: 978-0520250222

Belinda Thomson, Impressionism: Origins, Practice, Reception (Thames & Hudson, 2000). ISBN-10: 0500203350; ISBN-13: 978-0500203354

Additional required readings will be posted to Canvas or available on reserve.

 

 

ARTH 386/486 ISSUES IN AMERICAN ART – INDUSTRIAL DESIGN C. 1870 TO NOW

M/W 3:20-4:35 

Prof. Henry Adams 

One of the most momentous occurrences of the 20th and 21st centuries has received surprisingly little attention:  the transformation in how nearly everything around us is designed and made.  Chairs, desks, pens, cars, stoves, refrigerators, printing presses, lighting fixtures and children’s toys all look very different than they did a century ago, and often are made through manufacturing process and out of materials that did not exist then.  In broad strokes, this class will lay out a history of industrial design.  It will combine discussion of the work of flamboyant pioneers, such as Raymond Lowie and Norman Bel Geddes, with analysis of products being made today by figures such as Dieter Rams, Jony Ive and Philippe Starck.  The class will also include a tour of and introduction to the Industrial Design program of the Cleveland institute of Art, established by Viktor Schreckengost in 1933.   The class will require a few short papers and verbal presentations, and a final paper or design project.

 

 

 

ARTH 392/492 ISSUES IN 20TH/21ST CENTURY ART – RECONSIDERING THE OBJECT IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART – CMA Classroom A

T/TH 10-11:15

Prof. Eunyoung Park

This course will explore the reconsideration of and challenge to objects in 20th and early 21st century art through reading and discussion of critical and scholarly texts on the definitions of and debates about the medium of sculpture. Since Auguste Rodin’s radical break from classicism, modern and contemporary artists have introduced diverse mediums, techniques, and ideas that consider the relationship and interaction between three-dimensional objects and their physical, social, and cultural space. Following the significant moments in sculptural practices, such as Duchamp’s readymade, Constructivism, minimalism, anti-form movements, earthworks and land art, public art and site-specific art, commodity art, and body art, this course will discuss diverse issues in modern and contemporary art, including abstraction and representation, medium specificity, negative space, expanded field in sculpture, art and the public, and monumentality and anti-monumentality. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art, MOCA Cleveland, and Cleveland Clinic Collection will form an integral part of the course.

Haim Steinbach, Wild Things, 2011, CMA.

 

 

ARTH 394 DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR: ART AND VIOLENCE IN ANCIENT ROME

T/TH 2:30-3:45 – On Campus

Prof. Maggie Popkin

This Departmental Seminar examines how ancient Romans represented violence in their visual culture, and why. How did works of art and architecture respond to institutionalized violence such as gladiatorial combats, capital punishment, and war? Why were sometimes startling acts of violence, such as beheadings and torture, displayed on public monuments in Rome and across the empire, and what were the social ramifications of these displays? When, and to what social effect, was violence used as entertainment? How did monuments incite violence, and why were statues and painting sometimes the subjects themselves of violent acts? We will consider the many contexts in which violence appears in Roman art and architecture created by people from different social classes and geographic regions in the Roman world. Through case studies of specific artworks and monuments, close reading of primary and secondary sources, and visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art, students will gain a deeper understanding of how art both reinforced and subverted social norms of violence in ancient Rome—and of how art continues to play this role in our society today.

 

 

ARTH 395

AS ARRANGED

INTERNSHIP 

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

 

ARTH 398 

AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

STAFF

Individual research and reports on special topics.  Consent of Professor.

 

ARTH 399

AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS                                 

STAFF

Consent of Department Chair.  List name of supervising Professor

 

ARTH 489

AS ARRANGED

MA QUALIFYING PAPER                                                                                                    

STAFF

Graduating Art History (ARH) Masters students only.

 

ARTH 490B VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUM

Wednesday 10-12:30 

Prof. Holly Witchey

 

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations, focusing on the context of Western Europe and the United States. The art museum is a rich topic; this sequence of courses is mainly concerned with the collecting and exhibiting institution. As a result of this course, students should be familiar with the following topics:

  • The development and care of a collection, including acquisition, cataloging, and conservation
  • The display and housing of a collection, including internal and external museum architecture
  • The study and interpretation of the collection/exhibition, considering diverse publics
  • The governance of the institution, including project management, finance, and administration

Through the study of these topics, the student should be familiar with the following

concepts:

  •  The museum as a place for learning, research and scholarship.
  • The museum as steward of cultural property & issues of ethics and the

law.

As a result of studying with the course topics and concepts outlined above and the desired outcomes specified below, students should be prepared to undertake a professional level internship. In addition, through undertaking course assignments students will gain proficiency in written and verbal expression and deepen skills in critical thinking, analysis, and problem solving. While the acquisition of foreign language skills lies outside the scope of this course, students are nonetheless encouraged to develop their skills in this arena in order to read and interpret foreign language materials often associated with objects and museum projects.

 

 

ARTH 494 A-F

DIRECTED READINGS

Independent Study

Consent of professor

 

ARTH 496 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF WORKS OF ART

Thursday 1:00-3:30

Prof. Heather Galloway

 

This course will introduce students to the examination methods, terminology, ethics and goals of art conservation as it supports art historical research and practice.  We will explore the materials and construction of cultural artifacts looking for commonalities across media and cultures.  Assignments will focus on finding ways to describe and understand the physical object, the appearance of aging materials and the degree to which that alteration is or is not accepted.  As much as is possible, the class will be taught from the collections on display at the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) so that the students become familiar with reading the evidence of manufacture and condition in their direct study of art.   These observations will be augmented by in-class visits to conservation labs at the CMA to examine objects closely and to engage in discussions with conservators on how their treatment interventions affect what we see including their approaches to aesthetic compensation.

Readings:  Course readings will consist of articles and chapters of books that will be placed on reserve in the Ingalls Library at the CMA and/or posted on blackboard as PDFs.  Course Requirements:  Active participation in class discussions; one (1-2page) ungraded visual analysis of materials and structure and one longer technical research paper (12-15page) both based on objects in the CMA collection; consultation with CMA staff conservators with a knowledge base applicable to the research paper; and an in-class presentation based on that research.

 

 

ARTH 512 SEMINAR IN ANCIENT ART: PROCESSIONS AND POWER IN ANCIENT ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

Tuesday 10-12:30 

Prof. Maggie Popkin

 

This graduate seminar investigates ancient Roman processions and the ways in which art and architecture shaped, constructed, and performed them. We will pay particular attention to major imperial processions such as the triumphal procession and circus procession, though local processions may also be considered. We will interrogate the relationship between architecture, topography, performance, and power in Roman society, as well as consider how artistic representations of processions from around the Empire (from monumental relief sculptures to drinking vessels and coins) constructed historical knowledge and shared perceptions of these institutions. We will consider methodological problems of studying Roman art and architecture, including questions of definition, typology, viewer reception, and historical interpretation. Readings will include primary texts in translation as well as secondary scholarship.

 

 

ARTH 552 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN NORTHERN EUROPEAN ART – REMBRANDT AND VERMEER – EXCEPTIONAL OR EXEMPLARY?

Thursday 10-12:30 

Prof. Catherine Scallen

 

Seventeenth-century Dutch art is characterized by a diversity of genres, a variety of important artistic centers, and the vast number of paintings executed then—estimated at 5 to 10 million. The ownership of paintings and drawings was far more widespread than elsewhere in Europe, and astonished visitors to the United Provinces.  How, then to survey and categorize the “Dutch Golden Age?”  Today the general public knows this school best through two artists: Rembrandt van Rijn and Johannes Vermeer. Their names headline exhibitions, their art or lives have become the focus of films, and popular novels feature them as celebrities.   But does such a focus on two artists provide us with any reliable understanding of the larger artistic and social contexts of their country and era?   We will explore possible answers to this question through an examination of the reception of Rembrandt and Vermeer in modern times, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, through critical consideration of the historiographic record of scholarship and portrayals in popular culture.  Exhibition catalogues, monographs, novels, movies, videos, will provide us with the material for our investigation.  Requirements:  Students will lead discussions working in pairs and will give a class presentation and write a research paper (16-20 pages for MA students, 20-25 for doctoral students) on one aspect of the art and reception of Rembrandt and Vermeer.

 

 

ARTH 530 SEMINAR IN BYZANTINE ART – THE BYZANTINE CULT OF THE VIRGIN MARY: IMAGE, RITUAL, TEXT

Wednesday, 4:50-7:35 

Prof. Elizabeth Bolman

 

Devotion to the Virgin Mary can be visualized as a network of threads spanning both geography and time.  Textual attestations to her cult appear in the Eastern Mediterranean at a surprisingly early date, circa 200 C.E., in the apocryphal source commonly called the “Protoevangelium of James.”  Numerous visual representations of this figure, “The Mother of God,” (Theotokos) were produced in the East and West throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. In many, but not all, she holds the Christ child.  It may even be the case that she has been given visual form in art more than the adult Christ himself.  Physical manifestations of her cult from the Byzantine realm include large and small-scale works of art, architecture, and material culture.  These can be understood as material expressions of both personal devotion and church doctrine.

In this course we will consider textual, ritual and visual evidence for the cult of the Virgin Mary, from its beginnings through 1453 (the fall of Constantinople).  Material will be drawn from the Late Antique Mediterranean and its continuation in the civilization called Byzantium, with its capital at Constantinople (modern day Istanbul).  These data will be critically evaluated to assess whether they really show evidence of devotion to the Virgin Mary, or if in fact she is a focus of attention due to fundamental concerns about the nature of Christ.  One theme in this course will be gender, and how historically specific ideas about women and children shape representations of Mary, and also determine the character of her cult.

Too often the cult of the Virgin Mary has been essentialized, and has been seen as a sort of ahistorical, unintellectual manifestation of subterranean human desires for a mother-goddess.  In this course, the premise will be that ideas about gender and religious figures, and also visual representations of them and monuments dedicated to them, are constructed by individuals in actual social and historical contexts.  Historically specific links to mother-goddess cults will be evaluated for their relevance to the cult of the Virgin Mary.  The functional contexts of specific visual manifestations of the cult will be considered in an attempt to understand the variety within what at first appears to be uniformity.

No background in Late Antique or Byzantine art and architecture is required for this course

Mother of God Galaktotrophousa, north lobe, Red Monastery church triconch, secco painting, ca.6th c. Photograph: E. Bolman

 

 

ARTH 545: MELLON COLLECTIONS SEMINAR – SACRED NARRATIVES AND ARTS OF THE BOOK

Tuesday 1-3:30 – CMA Library Seminar Room

Prof. Elina Gertsman and Dr. Sonya Rhie Mace

 

The seminar would explore Islamic, Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, and Jaina manuscripts, and trace the development and metamorphoses of sacred narratives across these religious cultures. We will end with studying Indian painting created in the following two centuries, to see how sacred narratives transmuted and found resonances across multiple societies. The global turn in art history is currently at the forefront of our field, embraced and interrogated by museum professionals and academics alike. This seminar will participate in and contribute to this essential scholarly inquiry.

 

 

ARTH 601

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

STAFF

List name of supervising Professor.

 

ARTH 610B

ADVANCED MUSEUMS INTERNSHIP II

STAFF

List name of supervising Professor

 

ARTH 701                                                                                                                                       

DISSERTATION PH.D.

List name of supervising Professor.