College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Art History and Art

Department of Art History and Art

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Art History Course Offerings Fall 2014

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
ART HISTORY COURSES
FALL 2014

ARTH 101 M W F 10:30-11:20
PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS POPKIN
On Campus

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shaper the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to look at and discuss art works in the Cleveland Museum of Art and to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and assignments in the small group sessions.
Required text: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, vol. 1.
Recommended text: Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing about Art, 10/E  Pearson-Prentice Hall; 10th edition, 2010 Paperback: ISBN-10: 0205708250 ISBN-13: 9780205708253

ARTH 241 TTH 1:15-2:30
MEDIEVAL ART GERTSMAN
CMA Classroom E

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course.

Course requirements: two exams, research paper, class participation

Required books: Medieval Art, eds. D. Verkerk and H. Luttikhuizen (2nd edition, 2006); Reading the Middle Ages, ed. B. Rosenwein (2006); other readings available through JSTOR and EBSCO

ARTH 250 TTH 10-11:15
ART IN THE AGE OF DISCOVERY BENAY
CMA Classroom A
CMA Audit

Renaissance Europe was a place ripe for artistic and cultural revolution: in Italy the return of the papacy to Rome, the Venetian conquest of Constantinople, the revival of Plato and Aristotle, and the beginning of empirical science redefined the social and political landscape. In Northern Europe religious rebellion, foreign trade, and the discovery of the Americas fostered unprecedented technical innovations in the making and dissemination of art. How did anatomical dissection affect artists’ rendering of the human body? In what ways did the printing press impact the art market? And perhaps more importantly, how did such discoveries and depictions change our understanding of what it means to be human in the first place? In this course we will discuss the impact of these factors on the painting, sculpture, and architecture produced between the 14th and 16th centuries, focusing on the achievements of major artists across Europe (including Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, van Eyck, Bosch, Dürer and Bruegel).

Reading: Stephen Campbell and Michael Cole, Italian Renaissance Art (Thames and Hudson, 2012) ISBN 0500289433; Jeffrey Chipps Smith, The Northern Renaissance (Phaidon, 2004) ISBN 0714838675; additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Requirements: two 4-5 page papers, in-class mid-term examination, in-class final examination, and active participation in class discussions and group activities.

ARTH 307/407 TTH 2:45-4:00
ARTS OF CHINA GIUFFRIDA
CMA Classroom A
CMA Audit

This course explores a selection of major developments in Chinese visual and material culture from ancient times to the present day. We consider works in multiple media including bronzes, pottery, sculpture, calligraphy, paintings, ceramics and installations. We look into the roles of art in society, the relationship of art to political authority, the place of art in religious practice and experience, connections between art and literature, and how art relates to the expression of personal, social, political, and cultural identity. We pay particular attention to landscape painting; pictorial and sculptural programs of Buddhist grottoes; art commissioned and collected by the imperial court; objects associated with Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian religious practices and sacred sites; art produced during periods of non-Chinese rule under the Mongols and Manchus; the affects of foreign styles and ideas on artists; and the role of Chinese artists in the contemporary global art world and market. We also examine the role of museums in selecting, preserving, and presenting Chinese art in the 20th and 21st century. Visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art form an integral part of the course.

No textbook. Readings posted on BlackBoard.

Requirements: Three exams (including the final), weekly reading responses (one-two pages), two short papers, culminating project and active participation in class discussions

ARTH 342/442 M 2-4:30
ISSUES IN INDIAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART: QUINTANILLA
HISTORY OF MUGHAL PAINTING CMA Art Study Room
(Department consent to enroll required) Level 1

This course is being taught by Dr. Sonya Rhie Quintanilla, George P. Bickford Curator of Indian and Southeast Asian Art, Cleveland Museum of Art
Using works of art from the collection, students will be introduced to the historical development of Mughal court painting from India between the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Topics covered include the origins of Mughal painting, the role of European influence, relationships between text and image, and the reception of Mughal painting in the West. The course will also cover the historiography of exhibitions, and students will work with the curator to develop content for an exhibition planned at CMA for 2016.
Requirements include timely attendance at class meetings (late arrivals will not be admitted), a take-home mid-term examination, two writing assignments (sample labels and sample catalogue entries), one oral presentation, and a final project that consists of an exhibition proposal. Graduate students will be required to submit a research paper to support the idea of the exhibition proposal and will be given additional readings for comment and review over the course of the semester. Readings will be available on reserve at the Ingalls Library and Kelvin Smith Library and through JStor or Google Drive.
ARTH 390 MW 12:30-1:45
THE WORK OF ART AND THE MUSEUM ADAMS
On Campus

This course counts as a SAGES departmental seminar

From Ancient Greece to the Renaissance, from the Renaissance until the present day, humans have always been collectors. We are surrounded and surround ourselves with objects of material culture. But what makes an object an art object? How and why do things come to be put in museums and what happens to them when they get there? In this course students will explore practical and theoretical aspects of objects, art objects, collectors, collections, and museums.

There will be no final exam but regular writing assignments. The principal reference text for the class will be Joseph Alsop, The Rare Art Traditions, supplemented by shorter readings from books on the history of museums by Andrew McLellan, Walter Muir Whitehill, Carlin Tomkins, Aline Saarinen, Thomas Hoving, and others.

ARTH 393/493 W 5:00-7:30
CONTEMPORARY ART: CRITICAL DIRECTIONS TEIXEIRA
AN INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO, PERFORMANCE, AND CMA Classroom A
INSTALLATION ART

This course is an advanced survey course that proposes a full immersion in Contemporary Art trends, practices, and theories. An introduction to video, performance, and installation art, this course will cover such creative fields (as the breaking point from Modernism) by expanding on the history and development of each one of them since the 1960s-70s, while also looking at their interconnectedness and interdependence.

ARTH 395 AS ARRANGED
INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for undergraduate students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED
HONORS THESIS STAFF

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 490A F 2:00-4:30
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS WITCHEY
CMA Classroom A
This course examines the idea of the art museum in Western Europe and the United States. The yearlong sequence of courses (ARTH 490A & ARTH 490B) is primarily concerned with institutions that collect and exhibit works of art but students will be introduced to other types of collecting institutions during the sequence. During the first semester (ARTH 490A) coursework focuses on the general history of museums in the United States, museum collections, and inter-related topics of research, scholarship, and conservation; the second semester (ARTH 490B) focuses on special exhibitions, education & interpretation, and governance. The inter-connections between these broad fields will be demonstrated and reinforced throughout the year.
Texts required for this course are: David Bomford, Conservation of Paintings (New Haven, Ct.: Yale University Press, 2009). Stephen Conn, Museums and American Intellectual Life, 1876-1926 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998), Laurence Levine, Highbrow, Lowbrow: The Emergence of A Culture Hierarchy in America. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988), and Andrew McClellan, The Art Museum from Boulée to Bilbao (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008).

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP WITCHEY

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F) AS ARRANGED
DIRECTED READINGS
Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings BEFORE registering.

A: Non-Western Art GIUFFRIDA
B: Ancient Art POPKIN
C: Medieval Art GERTSMAN
D: Renaissance and Baroque Art BENAY OR SCALLEN
Baroque Art
E: American Art ADAMS
F: Modern Art STAFF

ARTH 495 T 10:00-12:30
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY GERTSMAN
CMA Library Seminar Room

This course is a writing- and discussion-intensive methodology course, open only to first-year graduate students in the department. Besides offering a synoptic view of critical theory and something of a smorgasbord of various art historical methodologies, the course will focus on sharpening students’ abilities to look and read critically; to do research effectively; to write and edit research papers; to understand and use the many tools of art historical analysis; to use sophisticated art historical vocabulary (as opposed to jargon); and to construct successful oral presentations. The larger goal of this course is to engage students with new ways of thinking and writing about art and its history, and to help them realize their own voices as writers within our field’s larger discourse.
Course requirements: three short papers, presentation, final paper, class participation, miscellaneous writing assignments

ARTH 512 W 2:00-4:30
PORTRAITURE IN THE CLASSICAL WORLD POPKIN
CMA Library Seminar
Room
This graduate seminar investigates portraiture in the classical world, with a particular focus on ancient Rome. How did Greeks and Romans define a portrait? What made some images of human figures portraits and others not? Could depictions of gods be portraits? Who commissioned portraits in the classical world, and who created them? In what contexts were portraits displayed, and to what ends? We will consider methodological problems of studying classical portraiture, including questions of definition, production, typology, viewer reception, and historical interpretation. Readings will include primary texts as well as secondary scholarship. The class will take advantage of the Greek and Roman holdings in the Cleveland Museum of Art, particularly the Museum’s excellent collection of Roman portraits.
Requirements: Weekly readings and short written responses. Active participation in class discussion, including leading at least one class discussion. Extended research project centered on an object in the CMA’s collection, resulting in an oral presentation and research paper.

ARTH 517 TH 11:30-2:00
HISTORY OF COLLECTING AND EXHIBITING CHINESE GIUFFRIDA
ART IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CMA Library Seminar
Room
This graduate seminar explores major themes, individuals, institutions, types of objects, and eras in the history of collecting and exhibiting Asian art. Adopting a cross-cultural and comparative approach, we investigate practices of collecting and display within Asia, as well as in Britain, Europe, and the United States. We examine personal, institutional, cultural and national aims for collecting and exhibiting Asian art, along with the processes involved in collection formation and exhibition organization. We also consider how exhibitions have served as social agents of discourse, acts of cultural diplomacy, and their impact on scholarship and the evolution of artistic canons. Topics include cross-cultural transfer and re-framing of objects; connoisseurship practices and aesthetic tastes; overlapping roles of private collectors, dealers, curators, and scholars; political, economic, and social factors that affect collecting and display; exhibitions and collections as expressions of cultural and national identity; the roles of imperialism, colonialism, and looting; and the circulation of objects in global art markets. Course focus rotates between specific regions and countries of Asia, types of objects, time periods, individuals, institutions and themes.
Note: Although we will obviously pay close attention to the history of the Chinese collection and related exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art, our investigations will also include many other institutional and private collections.

No textbook. Readings available at Ingalls Library, Google Drive, and BlackBoard.
Requirements: Series of short critical reflection papers, 15-20 page research paper, in-class presentation, active participation in class discussions.

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY
List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD
List name of supervising Professor.